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Just How Important is Greece?

Posted on: July 10, 2015 |

July 10th, 2015
Quarterly Report
John Ferguson, Principal

“Nay, an I tell you that, I’ll ne’er look you i’ the face again: but those that understood him
smiled at one another and shook their heads: but, for mine own part, it was Greek to me.
– Julius Caeser”

-Shakespeare

At the end of the day, Greece doesn’t mean a whole lot to the US economy. However, I’m sure you have
noticed that this country on the periphery of Europe has spent the last several weeks hijacking our
headlines.

These headlines seem to be one of the leading culprits behind the recent dips in stocks. I know that it
can be a shock to see the markets deep in the red, but let’s not lose sight of the forest for the trees. As
I’ve said before and will certainly say again: Short-term volatility is no reason to stress out. We need to
exhibit discipline during market turmoil in order to achieve our long-term goals.

So, just how important is Greece?

I’ve included a chart on the following page in order to put things in perspective. You will see that the
United States comprises 50.62% of global markets. Please then look near the very bottom and you will
find Greece representing 0.04% of the global markets. This certainly appears to be a case of the tail
wagging the dog.

We view this as an opportunity to rebalance funds into global equities, not a time to worry.

If you’re still concerned, please give us a call and we can discuss matters further.

 

DFA Global Market Breakdown 3-page

Investment advisory services offered through Ferguson-Johnson Wealth Management, a registered investment adviser.

This newsletter contains general information that may not be suitable for everyone. The information contained herein should not be construed as personalized investment advice. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. There is no guarantee that the views and opinions expressed in this newsletter will come to pass. Investing in the stock market involves gains and losses and may not be suitable for all investors. Information
presented herein is subject to change without notice and should not be considered as a solicitation to buy or sell any security.

Investing internationally carries additional risks such as differences in financial reporting, currency exchange risk, as well as economic and political risk unique to the specific country. This may result in greater share price volatility. Shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost.

*Rebalancing can entail transaction costs and tax consequences that should be considered when determining a rebalancing strategy.

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